Tandy On Real Estate

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Chamber Report on High Tech

This week, the Austin Chamber of Commerce published a report on the High Tech Industry: https://www.austinchamber.com/blog/06-05-2018-high-tech-industry

• Nearly 6,500 employers in the Austin metro area are in high tech industries.
• Jobs in Austin’s tech industries total over 138,500, or 14.1% of all jobs, compared to 7.0% nationally.
• In 2017, jobs in Austin’s high tech industries grew by 4.3%, surpassing the metro’s 3.2% total job growth.

Annual average employment in high tech industries in the Austin MSA in 2017 was 138,544, up 4.3% from 2016. That’s a stronger gain than the 3.2% increase for employment across all industries. High tech jobs represent 14.1% of all Austin area jobs in 2017 and 18.5% of the year’s net new jobs. Nationally, high tech accounts for 7.0% of all jobs.

This is important to Austin and to the Real Estate community overall because of the quality of the these jobs.  For all industries, the average annual salary in Austin is $59,742, up 4.3% from 2016, while the average salary for high tech jobs is $112,771, up 6.2%.

Average Annual Salary Austin MSA

Average Annual Salary Austin MSA

High Tech Jobs Austin MSA

High Tech Jobs Austin MSA

Housing Affordability

A dramatic shift has taken place over the last 7 years in housing affordability.  Home prices in Travis County under $150,000 have dropped from 27% to 2.6% of all sales.  In Williamson County, the drop has been more dramatic going from 36.5% to 2.2%.  And in Hays County, still more so, A dramatic shift has taken place over the last 7 years in housing affordability.  Home prices in Travis County under $150,000 have dropped from 27% to 2.6% of all sales.  In Williamson County, the drop has been more dramatic going from 36.5% to 2.2%.  And in Hays County, still more so, going from 42.3% to 3.2%.
In the $150,000 to $250,000 range, home prices also decreased 30.2% to 24.2% and 43% to 37.4% in Travis and Williamson respectively.  The percentage of homes in this price range increased in Hays County going from 31.1% to 44.7%.

Travis County Stats

Travis County Stats

Williamson County Stats

Williamson County Stats

Hays Stats

Hays Stats

Source: Real Estate Center at Texas A&M

State and Local Taxes Influence Homebuyer Migration

Overall taxation increasingly determines where people and companies choose to relocate. Last week Rob Chrisman talked about what makes homebuyers move in his daily newsletter. According to MarketWatch jobs are the determining factor for someone to relocate, second to state and local taxes.

ATTOM Data Solutions, national property database provider, released its 2017 property tax analysis for more than 86 million U.S. single family homes which shows that property taxes levied on single family homes in 2017 totaled $293.4 billion, up 6 percent from $277.7 billion in 2016 and an average of $3,399 per home — an effective tax rate of 1.17 percent.

For Daren Blomquist, Attom’s senior vice president, the story of national property taxes is the story of migration around the country. Blomquist told MarketWatch that taxes are “the icing on the cake” in areas that are seeing strong population inflows anyway.

“Among the counties that saw the biggest percentage of in-migration in 2017, according to Census data, all are in Texas, Florida, Georgia, or the Carolinas. Texas doesn’t have particularly low property taxes, but it has no personal income tax, making the overall tax burden much more manageable,” said Andrea Riquier of MarketWatch.

Texas is a pro-business state that continues to attract business and population.

Business Facilities Magazine ranked Texas as the top state in the nation for the Best Business Climate in the magazine’s 13th Annual Rankings Report. Out of all 50 states, Texas achieved the best overall performance in the 2017 State Rankings Report.

According to Texas Governor Abbott, “economic liberty is why Texas leads in job creation and in corporate expansion and relocations.  Restrained government, lower taxes, smarter regulations, right-to-work laws and litigation reform—these are the pro-growth economic policies that help free enterprise flourish and that attract business to Texas from states that overtax and overregulate.”

Austin continues to attract businesses, and is a hub for corporate and regional headquarters, including AMD, Apple, Bazaarvoice, Cirrus Logic, Dell, Dimensional Fund Advisors, eBay, Facebook, Freescale, General Motors, Hanger, Hewlett-Packard, HomeAway, Home Depot, IBM, LegalZoom, National Instruments, Oracle, Whole Foods, and Visa. Check out the  Austin Chamber of Commerce Austin’s major employers map.

Best and worst business climates.

24/7 Wall Street ranked best and worst business climates looking at nearly 50 measures of doing business, including economic conditions, business costs, state infrastructure, the availability and skill level of the workforce, quality of life, regulations, technology and innovation, and cost of living.

Massachusetts ranked No. 1 with a well-educated population that is a boon for state businesses. Such a population presents a more flexible and skilled talent pool for employers. Also, people with college educations tend to have higher incomes, which means they have more disposable income to spend. A nation-leading 42.7% of Massachusetts adults have a bachelor’s degree, compared to 31.3% of adults nationwide. The typical state household earns $75,297 a year, the fourth highest median income of any state and over $17,000 greater than the national median.

And, Louisiana ranked last. Working-age Louisianans are less likely than working-age Americans to have the qualifications for higher-skilled, higher-paying jobs. Just 23.4% of adults in the state have a bachelor’s degree, nearly the lowest percentage of all states. Unlike most states, Louisiana’s working-age population is also declining. In the Census’ American Survey of Entrepreneurs, 46% of state businesses reported unpredictable conditions having a negative impact on their business, and 48% reported slow business or lost sales, each among the highest shares in the country.

Texas ranked among the top states at No. 13.

  • 1-yr. real GDP change: -0.3% (7th largest decrease)
  • salary: $53,838 (12th highest)
  • Adults w/ bachelor’s degree: 28.9% (tied — 22nd lowest)
  • Patents issued/100,000 people: 35.7 (18th most)
  • Working-age population change, 2020-2030: -14.9% (4th largest growth)

According to USAToday, “like North Dakota and a few other oil-producing states, Texas’ economy has taken a beating from the more-than-three-years-long stretch of depressed crude oil prices. However, the state’s economy is more diverse than that of North Dakota, and GDP has contracted by just 0.3% in the most recently reported year. Credit agencies Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s clearly recognize the state’s stability and rate its debt a perfect AAA and Aaa, respectively, with a stable outlook. The state’s businesses not only benefit from a stable economy, but also from a growing labor force. Texas’ working age population is projected to grow by 14.9% between 2020 and 2030, the fourth most of any state.”

Austin MSA stands out with 42.8% having a bachelor’s degree or higher, as compared to 28.9% in Texas, and 31.3% in the United States. And, WalletHub ranked Austin-Round Rock No. 9 in the Most & Least Educated Cities of America.

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey

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SOURCE:
http://www.robchrisman.com/daily-mortgage-news-commentary/page/2/
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/americas-new-great-migration-in-search-of-lower-property-taxes-2018-04-05
https://www.attomdata.com/news/market-trends/home-sales-prices/attom-2017-property-tax-data-analysis/
https://gov.texas.gov/news/post/texas-ranked-top-state-for-business-climate-by-business-facilities-magazine
https://businessfacilities.com/2017/07/business-facilities-13th-annual-rankings-report/
https://www.austinchamber.com/upload/files/ed/MajorEmployersMap.pdf
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2018/03/05/economic-climate-best-and-worst-states-business/376783002/
https://www.austinchamber.com/economic-development/austin-profile/population#Educational%20Attainment
https://wallethub.com/edu/most-and-least-educated-cities/6656/

Austin Ranks No. 1 on Nation’s Best Places to Live

Two years running Austin is number one on the nation’s Best Places to Live according to U.S. News and World Report. For those of us who are Austinites and who are working in real estate, we know this to be true.

Austin took the lead again in the magazine’s 2018 edition of its Best Places to Live in the U.S. list, which ranks 125 major metro areas in four categories including desirability, value, job market, quality of life and net migration.

Check out the Top 10 cities.

2018 Top 10 “Best Places to Live”

  1. Austin
  2. Colorado Springs, Colorado
  3. Denver
  4. Des Moines, Iowa
  5. Fayetteville, Arkansas
  6. Portland, Oregon
  7. Huntsville, Alabama
  8. Washington, D.C.
  9. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
  10. Seattle

“When deciding on a place to settle down, it’s important to understand that where a person lives can impact their well-being,” said Kim Castro, executive editor at U.S. News. “U.S. News created the Best Places to Live to highlight areas across the country that have the characteristics residents are looking for, including steady job growth and affordability. The top-ranked places are areas where citizens can feel the most fulfilled socially, physically and financially.”

And, Austin is not stopping it’s growth, according to the Austin Business Journal Austin’s population keeps growing. In fact, there were 151 additions to the population a day in 2017, down only slightly from 159 in 2016.

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SOURCE:
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/10/us-news-world-report-the-10-best-places-to-live-in-the-us-in-2018.html
https://realestate.usnews.com/places/texas/austin
https://www.bizjournals.com/austin/news/2018/04/10/austin-no-1-again-on-revered-best-places-to-live.html?ana=e_ae_set1&s=article_du&ed=2018-04-10&u=CuOUKGCJY978Qy2wnhw9SA0f338830&t=1523397950&j=80955401
https://www.bizjournals.com/austin/news/2018/03/22/austins-population-keeps-popping-heres-how-many.html

Corporations Relocating to Texas and Austin

Here are some great articles highlighting the continued trend of corporations relocating to Texas and the Austin area:

Today, Ray Perryman reports that Texas again wins of Site Selection Magazine’s “Governor’s Cup” competition: Another Win for Texas – This award goes to the state with the most major corporate location and expansion projects in a year. The 2017 win is the sixth in a row for Texas. Lone Star State also won in 2004, 2005, and 2010 (and was a close second in several of the years between).  Last year, Texas had 594 projects with a capital investment of at least $1 million, 20 or more new jobs, or 20,000 square feet of new construction. Texas has resources corporations need: a large and growing population, oil and gas, a coastline favorable to shipping, abundant land, a relatively moderate climate, and a central location, among others.

Greater Austin Chamber of Commerce reports on Relocations and Expansions: 2016-2017 RELOCATIONS & EXPANSIONS LOG – note the large number of Headquarters that are expanding.

Other tech companies moving to Austin: Texas takeover: Why 5 tech companies relocated their headquarters to Austin – Great article which highlights the many reasons why companies want to relocate to Austin.

San Francisco article: Tech pipeline to Texas: Tax money, people flow out of Bay Area – which highlights the struggles of keeping companies in the bay area vs. moving to Austin for the labor they need to grow and expand.  This is a 2016 article but highlights the ongoing trend of companies moving from other states, particularly California, to Austin.

Links to articles:

CFPB advises lenders to assist consumers in disaster areas

Institutions supervised by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) can assist consumers in disaster areas by:

  • Offering penalty-free forbearance or repayment periods with clearly disclosed terms;
  • Limiting or waiving fees and charges, including overdraft fees, ATM fees, or late fees;
  • Restructuring existing debt by, for example, extending repayment terms with clearly disclosed terms;
  • Refinancing existing debt or extending new credit with terms favorable to the consumer. Terms could, for example, reduce costs, limit payment amounts, or offer consumers other flexibility;
  • Easing documentation or credit-extension requirements;
  • Increasing capacity for customer service hotlines, particularly those that serve consumers in languages other than English; and/or
  • Increasing ATM daily cash withdrawal limits

Click here for more information on the CFPB’s Statement on Supervisory Practices Regarding Financial Institutions and Consumers Affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

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SOURCE:
https://s3.amazonaws.com/files.consumerfinance.gov/f/documents/201709_cfpb_statement-on-supervisory-practice_hurricanes-harvey-and-irma.pdf
https://www.consumerfinance.gov/policy-compliance/guidance/implementation-guidance/statement-supervisory-practices-affected-hurricanes-harvey-and-irma/

FEMA and lender disaster notices

Listed below are excerpts from Rob Chrisman’s http://www.robchrisman.com/ daily blogs from August 22nd to September 7, 2017 regarding FEMA and lender disaster notices for your quick reference. Great advice for lenders, servicers and borrowers for dealing with disaster/flood related issues from Hurricane Harvey. 

With the natural disasters already plaguing regions across the United States, the FEMA website lists all declared incidents with a link to provide details specific to that area, including leaking chemical plants.

Most investors and lenders rely on FEMA to define a disaster and the area impacted. Of course, any monies about to be lent, and recently lent, in a disaster area are questionable from an investor’s perspective. Is the borrower safe, will they make their payments, is the collateral sound? Typically a correspondent investor, such as Chase, will have verbiage in their contract referring the seller to it in the event an area is declared an investor and requiring additional appraisals.

Partners can access Sun West Seller Guide under HELP section in Sunsoft (login required). Please refer to Sun West Forward Mortgage Seller Guide (Section 404.07) and Sun West Reverse Mortgage Seller Guide (Section 3.23) for more details.

Plaza Home Mortgage is reminding its clients to follows its Natural Disaster Policy, GD-PO-008 (login required) for properties located in these areas.

Pacific Union is monitoring the impact of severe storms and disaster declarations across several states as published by FEMA. Currently, loans secured by properties located in impacted areas are subject to standard Pacific Union protocol. Standard requirements for disaster areas apply for these properties as they relate to expectations from appraisers for existing pipeline and new applications. For loans secured by properties in affected areas, the appraiser must comment on the disaster and if there is an impact to the property and value.  In addition, all types of issued insurance policies (hazard, flood, windstorm, etc.) must have binding authority on the subject property. Upon delivery of a loan to Pacific Union Financial, the Correspondent must ensure that re-inspections have been completed and delivered to Pacific Union Financial for all impacted properties in accordance with Pacific Union’s Disaster Area Policy.

“The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and state bank regulators recognize the serious impact of Hurricane Harvey on the customers and operations of many financial institutions and will provide regulatory assistance to affected institutions subject to their supervision. The agencies encourage institutions in the affected areas to meet the financial services needs of their communities.

“Bankers should work constructively with borrowers in communities affected by Hurricane Harvey. The agencies realize that the effects of natural disasters on local businesses and individuals are often transitory, and prudent efforts to adjust or alter terms on existing loans in affected areas should not be subject to examiner criticism. In supervising institutions affected by the hurricane, the agencies will consider the unusual circumstances they face. The agencies recognize that efforts to work with borrowers in communities under stress can be consistent with safe-and-sound banking practices as well as in the public interest.

Community Reinvestment Act (CRA): Financial institutions may receive CRA consideration for community development loans, investments, or services that revitalize or stabilize federally designated disaster areas in their assessment areas or in the states or regions that include their assessment areas. For additional information, institutions should review the Interagency Questions and Answers Regarding Community Reinvestment here.

Freddie Mac’s disaster relief options will be available to borrowers with homes in presidentially-declared Major Disaster Areas where federal Individual Assistance programs are made available to affected individuals and households. Until then, servicers may leverage Freddie Mac’s forbearance programs to provide immediate mortgage relief to borrowers affected by the storm.

“We strongly encourage the many American families whose homes or businesses are being impacted by Hurricane Harvey to call their mortgage servicer if the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s declaration is announced,” said Yvette Gilmore, Freddie Mac’s Vice President of Single-Family Servicer Performance Management. “Relief — including forbearance on mortgage payments for up to one year — may be available if their mortgage is owned or guaranteed by Freddie Mac.”

Freddie Mac disaster relief policies authorize mortgage servicers to help affected borrowers in presidentially declared Major Disaster Areas where federal Individual Assistance programs have been extended. Freddie Mac mortgage relief options for affected borrowers in these areas include suspending foreclosures by providing forbearance for up to 12 months, waiving assessments of penalties or late fees against borrowers with disaster-damaged homes, and not reporting forbearance or delinquencies caused by the disaster to the nation’s credit bureaus.

Lenders are reminded that Fannie Mae has selling and servicing policies to assist impacted borrowers (or potential borrowers) following a disaster, such as the hurricane on the Gulf coast. Refer to Assistance in Disasters for information on where to find Fannie Mae’s policies for providing assistance to borrowers impacted by a disaster. View the press release.

Due to the potential impacts of Hurricane Harvey to the southern Texas coast, at this time, and until all affected areas have been identified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other sources, Pacific Union Financial, LLC will temporarily suspend the funding of loans secured by properties in impacted areas.

AmeriHome, with FEMA’s DR-4332, reminded clients that policies vary based on program and re-inspection requirements for transactions with and without appraisals. Sellers are reminded that they are responsible for determining potential impact to a property located in an area where a disaster is occurring or has occurred, irrespective of whether the property was included in an area covered by a disaster declaration. Sellers are also reminded that appraisal waivers and reduced appraisal types, such as Fannie Mae’s PIW and Freddie Mac’s ACE, are not eligible in areas impacted by disasters. See the respective Agency requirements for details.

AmeriHome reminded clients that for loans on properties involving transactions with appraisals for Fannie, Freddie, VA, and USDA, if the appraisal is dated on or before incident period end date, including on-going disasters where an incident end period date has not yet been declared then the re-inspection date must be prior to the declared incident period end date.

For non-agency, Core Jumbo, or FHA, if the appraisal is dated on or before incident period end date, the re-inspection date must be after declared Incident period end date. (In other words, re-inspection may not be completed until after the declared incident period end date).

For properties without an appraisal, a property inspection is required if no incident period end date has been declared and Loan Purchase is on or after incident period start date, or the incident period end date has been declared and Loan Purchase is on or within 90 days after incident period end date. Re-inspection type can utilize any of the property inspection types in Seller Guide Section 10.10.7.1., AND include an interior inspection with photos.

Sellers must follow Wells Fargo standard Disaster Policy for all properties located in ZIP codes that Wells Fargo Funding has determined were impacted by Hurricane Harvey. Precautions must be taken for Loans originated within affected areas. Regardless of whether FEMA has formally declared a disaster, all transactions showing any indication of damage to the collateral should comply with the published Disaster Policy Guidelines as outlined for customers here (login required).

Customers of Chase can visit the Correspondent Site for more information on appraisal requirements, and re-inspection requirements.

And, the same with SunTrust – it is spelled out in SunTrust’s seller guide.

NewLeaf Wholesale reminded its brokers that If the subject property is located in an impacted area, with a completed appraisal dated prior to the incident start date, a 1004D re-inspection completed by the Appraiser must certify that the property is free from the applicable natural disaster damage. For appraisals in an impacted area dated during the incident period, the Appraiser must: Comment on the condition of the property and any effects on the marketability AND add detailed language into the body of the appraisal confirming that the property is free from the applicable natural disaster damage OR provide a 1004D re-inspection to certify that the property is free from the applicable natural disaster damage. For appraisals in an impacted area dated after the incident end date, the Appraiser must: Comment on the condition of the property and any effects on the marketability AND add detailed language confirming that the property is free from the applicable natural disasters damage into the body of the appraisal.

As of August 30th, Flagstar Bank is suspending funding in Texas counties: Aransas, Bee, Brazoria, Calhoun, Chambers, Fort Bend, Galveston, Goliad, Harris, Jackson, Kleberg, Liberty, Matagorda, Nueces, Refugio, San Patricio, Victoria and Wharton. Louisiana parishes include: Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, Jefferson Davis, Orleans and Vermillion. Once funding has resumed, a re-inspection will be required in the counties identified. Loans that have already been issued a Final Approval Clear to Close status will be placed in an Approved with Conditions status until a re-inspection is performed. Please note that appraisal re-inspections are not required to be completed by the original appraiser; however, a Flagstar Bank eligible appraiser must be utilized. For loans that have an appraisal that was ordered via Loantrac, an appraisal re-inspection may be requested via the Appraisal Management module by selecting “Yes” to the “Do you need a property/Disaster Inspection” question.

M&T Bank will enforce the Disaster Re-Inspection Policy for all properties located in the affected counties of Aransas, Bee, Brazoria, Calhoun, Chambers, Fort Bend, Galveston, Goliad, Harris, Jackson, Kleberg, Liberty, Matagorda, Nueces, Refugio, San Patricio, Victoria, and Wharton.

Appraisals Completed prior to 8-28-2017 (Refer to Ex #03-600: Disaster Affected Areas, for expiration). For loans secured by properties, in the designated disaster areas, and appraised prior to the Federal Government / State Government declaration, please refer to the matrix for required Re-inspection guidance.

First Community Mortgage disaster policy and procedure can be viewed in its product full guidelines. View a copy of the FEMA declared disaster counties.

Wells Fargo Funding Sellers must follow its standard Disaster Policy for all properties located in counties identified by FEMA as being impacted. Precautions must be taken for Loans originated within affected areas. Regardless of whether FEMA has formally declared a disaster, all transactions showing any indication of damage to the collateral should comply with the published Disaster Policy Guidelines as outlined in Seller Guide Section 820.19: Disaster Policy and 820.20: When Required both found in our Conforming Underwriting Guidelines. (Government Loans must follow FHA/VA guidance.) Reminder: When the appraisal is completed on or after the disaster incident period end date, a full appraisal with exterior and interior inspection is required. This includes Loans where a PIW or equivalent was requested by the Automated Underwriting System (AUS).

PennyMac has posted Disaster Policy Implementation: Texas Hurricane Harvey. In response, FEMA has declared 18 counties in Texas as eligible for Individual Assistance. PennyMac’s Disaster Policy requires a post-disaster inspection on all properties located in counties eligible for Individual Assistance.  Due to the continued impact of Hurricane Harvey, FEMA has not declared an incident end date and PennyMac will not be accepting post-disaster inspections and additional counties may be added. PennyMac has also paused funding in the additional counties where the Texas Governor declared a State of Emergency due to the ongoing rain and flooding and potential for additional damage.  PennyMac will continue to monitor counties not yet declared for Individual Assistance for reinstatement.

AmeriHome is implementing re-inspection requirements for four additional Texas counties that were included in an amended State of Disaster declaration made 8/28/2017 by Texas governor Abbott. Those counties are Angelina, Orange, Sabine and Trinity. AmeriHome is also re-inspection requirements for FEMA declared Texas DR-4332 and Louisiana EM-3382.

“As we work together to support borrowers affected by Hurricane Harvey, lenders are reminded that Fannie Mae has selling and servicing policies to assist borrowers (or potential borrowers) affected by disaster. Refer to the Assistance in Disasters page for information about its policies for providing assistance to borrowers impacted by a disaster. Fannie will provide additional policy guidance in a separate lender communication.

In light of the devastation caused by Hurricane Harvey, if you have mortgages secured by properties in the affected areas that are in the delivery pipeline, you should remove these mortgages from a Guarantor pool or Cash commitment.”

Additionally, you should review Freddie Mac requirements related to properties affected by disasters to prepare to address impacted mortgages you originated and planned to sell to Freddie. “While it’s premature to determine the full impact of Hurricane Harvey, review the applicable sections of the Single Family Seller/Servicer Guide and your procedures for inspecting and updating a property’s value, condition and marketability when a major disaster or emergency occurs. Guide Section 5601.2 (c) – Requirements for properties affected by disasters, Guide Section 5601.2 (b) – Requirements for incomplete property improvement, Guide Section 4201.13 – Circumstances that adversely affect the value of the property.

We rely on you to determine the number of mortgages secured by impacted properties and the extent of damage to each property that may affect its acceptability as security for the mortgage.

As we continue to closely monitor the situation, we are grateful to our Seller/Servicers who are responding to requests for assistance from borrowers who are facing unexpected hardships because of the hurricane.”

As always, clients should read the full bulletins from lenders and investors. 

Fannie Mae reminds clients that “Following a disaster, we rely on our customers to implement our disaster relief policies and assist impacted homeowners. We require servicers to assess property damage and the needs of homeowners in order to provide appropriate relief. In addition, our Account Teams work closely with our customers to determine physical and operational impacts to their business operations and their ability to service mortgages owned or guaranteed by Fannie Mae.”

“Citibank Correspondent Lending is ready to help residents regain pre-storm business functionality. Among other assistance, Citibank will work with you on a case by case basis regarding loan file delivery and lock expiration dates, consider rate lock extensions based on your business needs due to storm damage1and consider fee waivers on issues arising due to the impact of the storm.

“As a reminder, Lenders represent and warrant that the properties securing all loans submitted to Citibank for purchase consideration have not been negatively impacted by any natural or man-made disaster as of the date Citibank purchases the loan. The Lender also represents and warrants that the borrower’s credit qualifications for the underlying loan have not been negatively impacted by any natural or man-made disaster as of the date Citibank purchases the loan.

“Lenders must have a process in place for identifying disaster areas and potential impact to properties that are the subject of loans proposed for sale to Citibank. If the Lender’s disaster policy includes a requirement for re-inspection of the property, the re-inspection should be included in the closed loan file submitted for purchase (i.e. appraisal ordered prior to the storm with closing after the event).”

Citi’s note finished with, “For loans originated after the storm, it is important to note that section 501 of the Correspondent Manual. Lenders are responsible for ensuring that the borrower’s credit qualifications for the underlying loan have not diminished because of the storm. Property or Lender’s place of business must be located in a FEMA disaster area.”

Because of the Presidential Declaration of a Major Disaster Area (PDMDA) in designated counties in the State of Texas due to damage caused by Hurricane Harvey, FHA is issuing this reminder to mortgagees originating and/or servicing mortgages in the affected PDMDAs: FHA-insured mortgages secured by properties in a PDMDA are subject to a 90-Day moratorium on foreclosures following the disaster. HUD provides mortgagees an automatic 90-Day extension from the date of the moratorium expiration date to commence or recommence foreclosure action or evaluate the borrower under HUD’s Loss Mitigation Program.

Mortgagees should review complete servicing guidance in the Single-Family Housing Policy Handbook (SF Handbook) 4000.1, Sections III.A.2 and III.A.3.c relating to the servicing of mortgages in PDMDAs.

In preparation for assisting homeowners with longer-term recovery efforts, mortgagees should also review: FHA’s 203(h) Mortgage Insurance for Disaster Victims requirements in Section II.A.8.b of the SF Handbook. The 203(h) program allows FHA to insure mortgages for victims of a major disaster who have lost their homes and are in the process of rebuilding or buying another home. FHA’s 203(k) Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance Program requirements in Section II.A.8.a of the SF Handbook. The 203(k) program provides mortgage financing or refinancing which includes the cost of home repairs – both structural and non-structural – into the loan amount. Mortgagees can find more information about the policies referenced above and other FHA PDMDA policies on the FHA Resource Center’s Online Knowledge Base.

The Mortgage Solutions Financial Disaster Policy must be followed for the following areas Texas DR-4332 and Louisiana EM-3382.

Mortgage Solutions guidelines have been updated to address any property area located in a FEMA declared disaster area requiring individual assistance or as determined by MSF. Search for a specific property provided by Disaster Assistance.gov.

Conventional, VA and USDA: Properties with an appraisal effective date prior to the date of the disaster, appraiser to provide a 2075 drive-by, 1004D update/completion report, or Disaster Inspection Report, or Disaster Area inspection prepared by a certified appraiser to verify home is not affected Specific requirements must be met within the inspection.

Specific to Conventional properties, disaster inspections are not required for DU Refi Plus and LP Open Access transactions. Property Inspection Waiver (PIW) is not eligible in disaster-impacted areas. If a FEMA disaster is declared after the loan has closed with a PUW, one of the above-listed exterior inspection documents is required.

FHA Properties with an appraisal effective date prior to the date of the disaster, appraiser to provide a 1004D update report, prepared by a certified FHA Roster Appraiser to verify home is not affected. Disaster inspections are not required on new FHA transactions endorsed by FHA prior to the disaster date. Disaster inspections are not required for FHA Streamline without Appraisal transactions.

NewLeaf sent out, “All subject properties in the areas impacted by the disaster require evidence that the subject sustained no damage from the identified disaster for NewLeaf transactions. As the effects of Hurricane Harvey are continuing, please note impacted areas are subject to change without notice.

If the subject property is in an impacted area listed on the NewLeaf incident table with a completed appraisal dated prior to the incident start date, a 1004D re-inspection completed by the Appraiser must certify that the property is free from the applicable natural disaster damage. For appraisals in an impacted area dated during the incident period, the Appraiser must: Comment on the condition of the property and any effects on the marketability AND add detailed language into the body of the appraisal confirming that the property is free from the applicable natural disaster damage OR provide a 1004D re-inspection to certify that the property is free from the applicable natural disaster damage.

Prior to closing and funding, ResMac, Inc. will require a property inspection for any loan secured by a property in the FEMA declared Texas DR-4332. If the subject property is in one of the impacted counties and the appraisal was completed prior to the incident period end date, ResMac will require a post disaster inspection confirming the property was not adversely affected by the disaster. The inspection report must be dated no earlier than the date of disaster conclusion as determined by FEMA and/or the State of Texas. Clients may utilize any of the following re-inspection options to satisfy the post disaster inspection requirement, with a photograph of the subject property: Property Inspection Report (Fannie Mae Form 2075/ Freddie Mac Form 2070), or Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Fannie Mae Form 1004D/Freddie Mac Form 442), or Uniform Residential Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae Form 1004/Freddie Mac Form 70), Exterior Only Appraisal Report (Freddie Mac Form 2055), Individual Condominium or PUD Unit Appraisal Report (Fannie Mae Form 1073/Freddie Mac Form 465), Disaster Inspection Certification from a Licensed Certified Inspector.

Flagstar will apply a 15 day, no cost extension to loans in the counties/parishes impacted by Hurricane Harvey that meet the following criteria: Must have a lock expiration date that falls between Friday, August 25, 2017 and Friday, September 15, 2017. Loan must be in underwriting and is not funded or in a closing package received status (i.e. approved with conditions, conditions received, and final approval). Flagstar will reduce funding extension fees to 1 basis point per day on delivered loans provided that all conditions are cleared except for the appraisal re-inspection.

AXIS AMC has been through several disasters across the country, and has been here to help guide and navigate our industry partners through each of them. Axis expects to see a multitude of Disaster Certifications needed on properties in those markets that have been affected although lending partners and other clients may have different reporting requirements and needs. If possible, send Axis any policy or requirements that you feel are specific to you and Axis will try to accommodate.

CoreLogic estimates that about 70% of the flood damage in Houston was uninsured. Lenders are worried about everything from lost closing packages to forced-placed insurance policies. The ABA estimates about 1,000 bank branches were impacted by the unprecedented rainfall and flooding of Hurricane Harvey. Hurricane Harvey comes at a time when the National Flood Insurance Program owes $24.6 billion to the Treasury already. This will put pressure on a program that is expiring this month. The impact of Harvey following Katrina means bankers should prepare for extreme regulatory scrutiny around all things flood-related at upcoming exams.

With the odds increasing that Irma will impact U.S. holdings, including Florida, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is busy indeed. Those impacted should register with FEMA online, in person at a disaster recovery center or by calling 1-800-621-3362. They should also have their homeowner’s insurance company contact info, plus flood or earthquake insurance company, if either applies, and their mortgage servicer.

What if a borrower can’t pay their mortgage? If the disaster makes it impossible to make monthly house payments, borrowers should ask their servicer for mortgage forbearance. A forbearance allows one to stop making payments for an agreed-upon time. In a forbearance agreement, one might make partial payments or stop making payments for a specific time. Generally, a forbearance lasts up to six months and can be extended up to another six months. Interest still accrues during the time the debtor isn’t making full monthly payments. But under a forbearance agreement, the lender won’t charge late fees or report them to credit bureaus.

Of course, the lender/servicer will want the mortgagor to catch up on missed payments after the forbearance period is over. That might involve paying extra every month for a few years, modifying the loan, or reaching some other negotiated agreement. Freddie Mac spread the word that if applicable, a mortgage loan is in forbearance for 24 months, Freddie will repurchase the loan from its mortgage participation certificates.

Some borrowers talk with a Department of Housing and Urban Development-approved housing counselor before agreeing to forbearance. HUD: 1-800-569-4287.

There is also aid available. Direct federal aid consists mostly of loans from the Small Business Administration which oversees delivering disaster-related loans to individuals and families. The SBA extends loans at favorable interest rates to replace or repair primary residences. Someone can borrow up to $200,000 to cover renovation or construction costs, and regardless of whether someone is a renter or a homeowner, the SBA will lend you up to $40,000 to replace personal property such as clothing, furniture, appliances and vehicles.

FEMA offers grants to fill in gaps between insurance payouts and SBA loans. The maximum grant is $33,300 per household for disasters that happen in the fiscal year that ends Sept. 30, 2017. Grants can be used for expenses such as basic home repairs that aren’t covered by insurance, temporary rent and disaster-caused medical and child care. For more information, read the section called “What Does Individual Assistance Cover?”

The Federal Housing Administration has a program that’s designed to help disaster survivors rebuild or buy replacement homes. Under the Section 203(h) program, the FHA insures mortgages for people whose homes were destroyed or damaged in disasters. Borrowers don’t have to make a down payment.

Even when a house is destroyed the mortgagor should continue paying on the note until they have talked with the servicer and have reached a settlement with the insurance company. After all, the borrower promised to repay the loan when they signed the mortgage documents at closing. The borrower is liable for the loan debt, and making their payment is part of the borrower’s contractual obligation.

Servicers are contacting borrowers. In response to Hurricane Harvey, Freddie Mac is allowing servicers to “verbally grant” 90-day forbearances, and Fannie Mae is letting servicers grant 90-day forbearances “even if they cannot contact the impacted homeowner immediately.”

AFR Wholesale is conducting a webinar for brokers to provide answers and solutions to guide their customers with the best options to help them rebuild in the wake of natural disasters, like Hurricane Harvey. The webinar will focus on products, like the 203(h) mortgage insurance program that helps victims in Presidentially designated disaster areas recover by making it easier for them to re-establish themselves as homeowners. Scheduled for this Friday, September 8th from 2-3PM EST, those interested in this timely webinar on disaster relief resources can register here.

Wells Fargo is taking steps to assist borrowers in the Hurricane Harvey affected areas. If you’re aware of a Wells Fargo Home Lending borrower in need, share the following information: Wells Fargo Home Lending customers can contact us at 1-888-818-9147, Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. CT, and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2PM CT. All Wells Fargo customers can reach us at 1-800-TO-WELLS if they need assistance or have questions. Our mobile response unit will be deployed to the affected area once the situation is stabilized. Wells Fargo customers will be able to receive in-person assistance with their mortgage, home equity or auto loans. Wells Fargo is waiving ATM fees for customers in the affected areas, as well as reversing other fees – such as late fees – for all our consumer products, including credit cards and checking accounts.

On 9/1/2017, with Amendment #3 to DR-4332, FEMA announced federal disaster aid with individual assistance for 3 additional Texas counties.

The Texas Appraiser Licensing and Certification Board (TALCB) has announced that any appraiser license that expires in the month of August will be extended 30 days due to delays caused by Hurricane Harvey. In addition, open applications for licenses that expire between August 21, 2017 and September 30, 2017 will be extended by 30 days. If a Pacific Union Financial loan file includes a Texas appraisal license with an expired license that is within the dates detailed above, include a screenshot of the TALCB announcement with the appraiser’s license in the loan file.

Loans secured by properties located in impacted areas are subject to suspension of funding or proceeding with caution according to standard Pacific Union protocol. Standard requirements for disaster areas apply for the funding of properties as they relate to expectations from appraisers for existing pipeline and new applications. For loans secured by properties in affected areas, the appraiser must comment on the disaster and whether there is an impact to the property and value.  In addition, all types of issued insurance policies (hazard, flood, windstorm, etc.) must have binding authority on the subject property. Its Disaster Area Policy, Pacific Union reserves the right to impose restrictions and/or suspend funding, without notice, in additional areas subject to any adverse event that may impact the safety/habitability/value of impacted properties.

Mortgage Solutions Financial has posted revised information on affected areas due to Hurricane Harvey. Lenders are reminded its disaster policy must be followed.

PennyMac posted updates to Texas Hurricane Harvey requirements.

FAMC is requiring disaster re-inspections that are dated after the incident end date on properties affected by Hurricane Harvey. Due to unprecedented levels of rainfall and the ongoing flooding caused by this event, the extent of all impacted areas is currently unknown. Once the incident end date is established by FEMA, it will be published on the Disaster County Detail Worksheet located on the FAMC website.

M&T Bank will enforce the Disaster Re-Inspection Policy for all properties located in the affected counties. For loans secured by properties, in the designated disaster areas, and appraised prior to the Federal Government / State Government declaration, refer to the M&T Bank matrix for procedures.

Before going on, readers should a commentary piece yesterday was written by NerdWallet’s Holden Lewis. The article for those impacted by disasters is titled, “What to do after a disaster hits your home, mortgage,” was published on Sept. 1 and can be found on this page. Credit is due where credit is due, and in this case to Mr. Lewis – my apologies.

Of particular interest to lenders looking to pick up a point or two is the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) information. “Financial institutions may receive CRA consideration for community development loans, investments, or services that revitalize or stabilize federally designated disaster areas in their assessment areas or in the states or regions that include their assessment areas. For additional information, institutions should review the Interagency Questions and Answers Regarding Community Reinvestment here.”

Freddie Mac confirmed that its disaster relief options, like Harvey, will be available to homeowners in impacted areas. “Freddie Mac’s disaster relief options will be available to borrowers with homes in presidentially-declared Major Disaster Areas where federal Individual Assistance programs are made available to affected individuals and households…Freddie Mac mortgage relief options for affected borrowers in these areas include: Suspending foreclosures by providing forbearance for up to 12 months; Waiving assessments of penalties or late fees against borrowers with disaster-damaged homes; and not reporting forbearance or delinquencies caused by the disaster to the nation’s credit bureaus.”

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SOURCE:
http://www.robchrisman.com/

Self-made millionaire: Not buying a home is the single biggest millennial mistake

According to CNBC not buying a home is the single biggest mistake of a millennial. Financial author David Bach says that, “millennials are making a big mistake by not owning a home.” According to his calculations today’s homeowner is on average 38 times wealthier than a renter.

Rent vs. buy
There is a lot of debate out there on if it is better rent or buy. According to Trulia buying is 28% less expensive than renting nationwide. For those of you in the Austin-Round Rock area buying a home is 45% cheaper than renting.

Trulia makes this calculation based on the following assumptions: a $1,650 monthly rent, $230,000 target home price, staying in the home for 7 years, a 25% income tax rate, and a 3.65% mortgage rate.

Zillow also offers a breakeven horizon calculator to calculate how many years it will take before the cost of buying will equal the cost of renting. For Austin, TX, using the same $1,650 monthly rent and $230,000 target home price, after 1 year and 11 months, buying will be cheaper than renting when you out 20% down. If you put 10% down, after 2 years and one month buying will be cheaper than renting.

Making the investment
Bach argues that you have to live somewhere for the rest of your life, so you might as well invest in a home that you could own permanently. By the time you spend all of your money on rent, you come up empty handed with no investment.

For those considering home ownership for the first time, here are a few tips offered by the financial author.

Tips for first-time homeowners:

  • Calculate your costs.
  • Your first home expense can be minimized with a studio or smaller home.
  • Make sure your total monthly housing cost does not take up more than 30% of your take home pay.
  • Put down at least 10%; The bigger your down payment the lower your loan rate.
  • Borrow 10-20% less than the bank’s willing to lend you.
  • Don’t buy if you plan to move in less than 5 years.

Remember, your first home is more than likely not going to be your dream home. This is ok. Get in a home and begin to build your wealth. Bach says that by the time you are in your 50’s or 60’s you should be able to retire off the money from your home.

The decision is yours
As with any financial decision you make, it depends on your personal situation. Home ownership needs to be the right decision for you and one that you enter into both prepared and cautiously. It takes financial stability and responsibility to be a homeowner, and you need to fully understand the cost associated with your home. Make sure you partner with a trusted lender to understand your financial situation, a REALTOR® as you embark on this decision, and title company to help you through the homebuying process. The American Land Title Association offers a Home closing 101 to help you through this process.

With home prices remaining moderate with only slight increases and continuing low interest rates, my bet is that the American Dream is still a safe bet – no matter what generation you are.

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SOURCE:
http://www.cnbc.com/2016/12/30/self-made-millionaire-buy-a-home.html
http://davidbach.com/
https://www.trulia.com/rent_vs_buy/
https://www.zillow.com/rent-vs-buy-calculator/
http://www.homeclosing101.org/

 

A vision for homebuilding

At the National Association of Real Estate Editors (NAREE) Conference in Denver, Douglas Yearley, CEO of Toll Brothers presented the Keynote Address “A Vision for Homebuilding”. Here is a snapshot of his state of builder/buyer.

Business is good
Toll Brothers announced earlier this summer that they had the best spring selling season that it has had in the past ten years. This can be attributed to many things:

  • Low interest rates
  • Rising home values
  • Consumer confidence
  • Improving job growth, along with wage growth

There are low inventories in most markets in used homes, and we finally have release of pent up demand. As the economy improves and personal balance sheets improve, pent up demand could bring people off the sidelines.

A slow recovery
According to Toll Brothers, we have seen a slower recovery than past cycles:

  • Key metrics are improving
    • Number of households has grown 98% since 1970.
    • 1980 – 1989 – 1.49 million housing starts
    • 2008 – 2016 – .85 million housing starts
    • Home ownership peaked in 2004 at 69%.
    • Today’s home ownership rate is at 63.6%.

We are not quite where we should be. We are still behind the demand, but this only leave room for growth.

Buyers buying new and where the sun shines
There is a 32% premium from a new home to used home. The average is 18%. People are gravitating to buying new homes as the used inventory is older. And, energy efficiency and the opportunity to customize home is driving the premium.

More than 50% of Toll Brothers’ business in done in the West. Denver to the West is where builders are focused. Builders are focused on pro-business states, where land is available and where people want to live – where the sun shines. Boomers are buying in Florida, no big surprise here. And, Texas, a pro-business state, is doing very well in Dallas.

Demographics – the Boomer is driving growth
Baby boomers continue to drive Toll Brothers’ business. As they did for years when they moved to suburban areas to “move up”, and still today as they downsize and prepare for the next stage of their life. Many are buying into active-adult communities or are buying second homes in Palm Springs, Florida and Scottsdale, Arizona.

Design trends – casual family-friendly spaces
According to Toll Brothers the open, casual living with free flow indoor and outdoor space has completely caught on. People want casual environments where living space is connected. And, where the outdoors is a continuation of the home. Where the back of the home will be one big wall of glass making the outdoors, the indoors.

There is also a trend for multi-generational living. With additional living space with a sitting area, little kitchen area, direct access outside and separate entry in the home for older generations living with their family.

And, smart home solutions are evolving and expanding with the ability to remotely control the home.

Labor on the rise
We went from two million houses a year to 500,000. Labor dramatically went away. And, every market has a different issue; there is no national plumber. As we get further into recovery, we are seeing improvements and a return of the builder labor market. Contractors are ramping up their businesses. There is still cost pressure, but according to Yearley, it is definitely less now than it was a year or two ago.

Getting creative with land acquisition
For Builders it is all about the land – whether you are building one home or a master-planned community. You are stuck with the land once you buy it. Builders have to be much more creative in how they look for buy land because people want to live differently. Buyers want to live in a more connected community. And, creativity comes into play due to the availability of land in urban areas. An example of this creativity in land acquisition is buying a car dealership and renovating it. Or, building a park with the mixed use and condo development as part of the sales price for the land, like Maxwell House, former Maxwell House Coffee plant, in Hoboken, NJ. This was the largest in the world and a landmark on the Hudson River since 1939. What was a tragedy for Hoboken is now a trendy redevelopment leveraging both the best of the outdoor and the indoor space.

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SOURCE:
National Association of Real Estate Editors (NAREE) Conference
Toll Brothers
https://www.upi.com/Archives/1990/06/27/Landmark-Maxwell-House-plant-to-shut-down/2261646459200/

 

 

 

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