Tandy On Real Estate

Category

Population Change

State and Local Taxes Influence Homebuyer Migration

Overall taxation increasingly determines where people and companies choose to relocate. Last week Rob Chrisman talked about what makes homebuyers move in his daily newsletter. According to MarketWatch jobs are the determining factor for someone to relocate, second to state and local taxes.

ATTOM Data Solutions, national property database provider, released its 2017 property tax analysis for more than 86 million U.S. single family homes which shows that property taxes levied on single family homes in 2017 totaled $293.4 billion, up 6 percent from $277.7 billion in 2016 and an average of $3,399 per home — an effective tax rate of 1.17 percent.

For Daren Blomquist, Attom’s senior vice president, the story of national property taxes is the story of migration around the country. Blomquist told MarketWatch that taxes are “the icing on the cake” in areas that are seeing strong population inflows anyway.

“Among the counties that saw the biggest percentage of in-migration in 2017, according to Census data, all are in Texas, Florida, Georgia, or the Carolinas. Texas doesn’t have particularly low property taxes, but it has no personal income tax, making the overall tax burden much more manageable,” said Andrea Riquier of MarketWatch.

Texas is a pro-business state that continues to attract business and population.

Business Facilities Magazine ranked Texas as the top state in the nation for the Best Business Climate in the magazine’s 13th Annual Rankings Report. Out of all 50 states, Texas achieved the best overall performance in the 2017 State Rankings Report.

According to Texas Governor Abbott, “economic liberty is why Texas leads in job creation and in corporate expansion and relocations.  Restrained government, lower taxes, smarter regulations, right-to-work laws and litigation reform—these are the pro-growth economic policies that help free enterprise flourish and that attract business to Texas from states that overtax and overregulate.”

Austin continues to attract businesses, and is a hub for corporate and regional headquarters, including AMD, Apple, Bazaarvoice, Cirrus Logic, Dell, Dimensional Fund Advisors, eBay, Facebook, Freescale, General Motors, Hanger, Hewlett-Packard, HomeAway, Home Depot, IBM, LegalZoom, National Instruments, Oracle, Whole Foods, and Visa. Check out the  Austin Chamber of Commerce Austin’s major employers map.

Best and worst business climates.

24/7 Wall Street ranked best and worst business climates looking at nearly 50 measures of doing business, including economic conditions, business costs, state infrastructure, the availability and skill level of the workforce, quality of life, regulations, technology and innovation, and cost of living.

Massachusetts ranked No. 1 with a well-educated population that is a boon for state businesses. Such a population presents a more flexible and skilled talent pool for employers. Also, people with college educations tend to have higher incomes, which means they have more disposable income to spend. A nation-leading 42.7% of Massachusetts adults have a bachelor’s degree, compared to 31.3% of adults nationwide. The typical state household earns $75,297 a year, the fourth highest median income of any state and over $17,000 greater than the national median.

And, Louisiana ranked last. Working-age Louisianans are less likely than working-age Americans to have the qualifications for higher-skilled, higher-paying jobs. Just 23.4% of adults in the state have a bachelor’s degree, nearly the lowest percentage of all states. Unlike most states, Louisiana’s working-age population is also declining. In the Census’ American Survey of Entrepreneurs, 46% of state businesses reported unpredictable conditions having a negative impact on their business, and 48% reported slow business or lost sales, each among the highest shares in the country.

Texas ranked among the top states at No. 13.

  • 1-yr. real GDP change: -0.3% (7th largest decrease)
  • salary: $53,838 (12th highest)
  • Adults w/ bachelor’s degree: 28.9% (tied — 22nd lowest)
  • Patents issued/100,000 people: 35.7 (18th most)
  • Working-age population change, 2020-2030: -14.9% (4th largest growth)

According to USAToday, “like North Dakota and a few other oil-producing states, Texas’ economy has taken a beating from the more-than-three-years-long stretch of depressed crude oil prices. However, the state’s economy is more diverse than that of North Dakota, and GDP has contracted by just 0.3% in the most recently reported year. Credit agencies Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s clearly recognize the state’s stability and rate its debt a perfect AAA and Aaa, respectively, with a stable outlook. The state’s businesses not only benefit from a stable economy, but also from a growing labor force. Texas’ working age population is projected to grow by 14.9% between 2020 and 2030, the fourth most of any state.”

Austin MSA stands out with 42.8% having a bachelor’s degree or higher, as compared to 28.9% in Texas, and 31.3% in the United States. And, WalletHub ranked Austin-Round Rock No. 9 in the Most & Least Educated Cities of America.

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Community Survey

To receive more posts like this from Tandy on Real Estate updates direct to your inbox, please subscribe.

SOURCE:
http://www.robchrisman.com/daily-mortgage-news-commentary/page/2/
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/americas-new-great-migration-in-search-of-lower-property-taxes-2018-04-05
https://www.attomdata.com/news/market-trends/home-sales-prices/attom-2017-property-tax-data-analysis/
https://gov.texas.gov/news/post/texas-ranked-top-state-for-business-climate-by-business-facilities-magazine
https://businessfacilities.com/2017/07/business-facilities-13th-annual-rankings-report/
https://www.austinchamber.com/upload/files/ed/MajorEmployersMap.pdf
https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2018/03/05/economic-climate-best-and-worst-states-business/376783002/
https://www.austinchamber.com/economic-development/austin-profile/population#Educational%20Attainment
https://wallethub.com/edu/most-and-least-educated-cities/6656/

Austin Ranks No. 1 on Nation’s Best Places to Live

Two years running Austin is number one on the nation’s Best Places to Live according to U.S. News and World Report. For those of us who are Austinites and who are working in real estate, we know this to be true.

Austin took the lead again in the magazine’s 2018 edition of its Best Places to Live in the U.S. list, which ranks 125 major metro areas in four categories including desirability, value, job market, quality of life and net migration.

Check out the Top 10 cities.

2018 Top 10 “Best Places to Live”

  1. Austin
  2. Colorado Springs, Colorado
  3. Denver
  4. Des Moines, Iowa
  5. Fayetteville, Arkansas
  6. Portland, Oregon
  7. Huntsville, Alabama
  8. Washington, D.C.
  9. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
  10. Seattle

“When deciding on a place to settle down, it’s important to understand that where a person lives can impact their well-being,” said Kim Castro, executive editor at U.S. News. “U.S. News created the Best Places to Live to highlight areas across the country that have the characteristics residents are looking for, including steady job growth and affordability. The top-ranked places are areas where citizens can feel the most fulfilled socially, physically and financially.”

And, Austin is not stopping it’s growth, according to the Austin Business Journal Austin’s population keeps growing. In fact, there were 151 additions to the population a day in 2017, down only slightly from 159 in 2016.

To receive more posts like this from Tandy on Real Estate updates direct to your inbox, please subscribe.

SOURCE:
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/10/us-news-world-report-the-10-best-places-to-live-in-the-us-in-2018.html
https://realestate.usnews.com/places/texas/austin
https://www.bizjournals.com/austin/news/2018/04/10/austin-no-1-again-on-revered-best-places-to-live.html?ana=e_ae_set1&s=article_du&ed=2018-04-10&u=CuOUKGCJY978Qy2wnhw9SA0f338830&t=1523397950&j=80955401
https://www.bizjournals.com/austin/news/2018/03/22/austins-population-keeps-popping-heres-how-many.html

The housing shortage

At the National Association of Real Estate Editors Conference (NAREE) in Denver this month “The housing shortage: dealing with barren inventory” was presented. The panel presenting included Thomas O’Grady, Pro Teck Valuation Services; Aaron Terrazas, Zillow; and Javier Vivas, realtor.com. Here is a snapshot of what was covered.

According to the panel we have had 23 months of historic low home sales. With 200K fewer homes for sale, and 150K of the homes being in the mid- to low-tier. We are losing inventory at record pace and in a segment where we are seeing the most demand – in the entry-level buyer. The shortage is national, and in smaller square footage homes.

When looking at the inventory shortage, there are two factors to consider:

  1. Homes hitting the market are selling fast.
  2. There are not enough homes entering the market.

What’s causing the inventory shortage?

  1. New construction has lagged among existing home sales. Homebuilders are not building at the levels they were.
  2. Homeowners have negative equity in some markets.
  3. There is a shift of owner occupied stock to rented occupied stock with 6.3 million more renter-occupied.
  4. The power of psychology. There is a psychology of market for seller; they are holding on to homes to see what kind of gains they can get.

The homebuilder blame game

Homebuilders are getting a lot of the blame, particularly for affordable homes. 24% of all home building costs is put towards regulations – making it expensive for builders to build. And, there is a ack of labor and a high cost of acquiring land. Smaller builders are also having issues will accessing financing.

Housing trends:

It’s hard to move up in a rising market

People aren’t selling because they cannot replace what they have. Buying up is becoming out of people’s grasp in some markets. There is a fear that I can’t put my house in market because I won’t be able to find anything to buy. This is the inverse of what we had in the boom. Appreciation and run upon price is going to hit into affordability, and as always, people want to get a deal.

A rise in home equity

In appreciating markets where the homeowners have equity and a low interest rate, we are seeing homeowners tap into equity and make home improvements versus putting their homes on the market. 40% of home owners have more than 20% equity. And to further support this, people are staying in homes for 10 years which is an all-time high. This stat used to be only 6 years.

Homeowners in love with their loans Many homeowners are locked in by their super affordable mortgage rate. REALTORS® are starting to say that they have more people in love with their loan than with their home. Many homeowners do not want hassle with competitive market.

Investors are staying in the market

Investors propped up the market by buying homes in the crash. People thought they would sell them but they have been making so much money that they aren’t selling. Rental securitizations are bringing a lot of liquidation. We are seeing this more in urban areas.

Seasonal adjustment disorder

Spring buying season started in the winter this year. This is a very big trend this year. Spring home buying season started 3 weeks earlier based on online activity and market velocity. We typically see a spike in online activity in January. This year we saw a peak at the second week of January. This is important because we saw buyers earlier. 1 in 4 homes are selling in less than a month – typically the housing market hits that in March, but this year we hit it in January. And, some of this seasonal adjustment disorder is attributable to the shift in the population demographics. Younger buyers are not held to seasonality and schools.

The urbanization of employment

Job growth – employment growth over past decade has been concentrated in urban areas. There is an employment drive in a lot of markets. The panel called this the Urbanization of employment – creating white collar jobs.

Creating “gray space”

We are seeing people moving further out and now seeing commuting as a more viable solution for home ownership. A good example of this is people moving from San Francisco to Antioch.

In Nashville the population grew by 10%, but housing stopped and home prices went up. People can’t afford to live there anymore. The Mayor is trying to put housing along transit roots to make more affordable home options.

There is an urban, suburban myth. Will urban searchers ever compromise on their urban dream, or will they move to the “gray space”? These are the “gray spaces” between urban and suburban popping up and picking up in demand. The future of housing could be the Long Island’s of the U.S.

Building wealth and potentially frustration

There is a shadow buyer demand – a lot of renters who got in their rental really wanted to buy. They had no other option and needed the extra space. People want the white picket fence, and are almost frustrated that they cannot get it.

Boomers have preached that the best way for middle class to build wealth is through home ownership. Buyers not yet on the market are asking themselves, “Will I have less wealth because I entered the market later in life compared to the baby boomer?” There is a common legacy of thinking that owning a house is a big deal, and we will see frustration around this.

It is getting harder to get into the market. Many potential homebuyers know that the longer they wait the harder it will be to get into the housing market. The market at the entry level is very competitive. The high end the market is slowing down a bit.

All of this will resolve itself through natural evolutions. LA was a low-cost alternative to NY. And now, Dallas is a low cost alternative to LA.

Ways of adapting to the shortage

  • Seeing more multigenerational, joint home investments.
  • The spillover effect – people will move further out and commute longer.
  • Mermaid effect – people are falling in love with their 2nd and 3rd home choices.
  • Macroeconomic play in effect that will make us have to wait it out.
  • Only feasible relief is through the homebuilders.

Despite all of this according to the panel, the U.S. real estate is one of the most attractive asset classes.

To receive Tandy on Real Estate updates direct to your inbox, please subscribe.

SOURCE:
https://www.proteckservices.com/category/home-value-forecast/
https://www.zillow.com/research/about-us/aaron-terrazas/
http://research.realtor.com/

 

Top 10 issues affecting real estate

The Counselors of Real Estate® (CRE) announced on June 14, 2017 the CRE 2017-2018 Top Ten Issues Affecting Real Estate at the National Association of Real Estate Editors Annual Conference in Denver last week. In the presentation Scott Muldavin, 2017 chair of The Counselors of Real Estate,  revealed the Top Ten issues, and then broke out the impact on both residential and commercial real estate. Today I will cover how the Top Ten affects residential real estate according to CRE.

 

 

  1. Political polarization and global uncertainty

Watch any bit of news or fake news, and you know this one to be true, but how does this impact real estate? As we continue to see uncertainty about changes to trade, travel and immigration policy threaten cross-border investing, hospitality properties, retail and manufacturing supply chains. Middle class how ownership will also be impacted as interest rates rise.

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Consumer price index rise
  • Interest rate rise
  • Mortgages less affordable
  • Polarized communities.
  1. The technology boom

We have seen the boom in apps. It is now at an inflection point where the use of technology will totally effect the real estate industry. In 2016 2.7 billion was spent in real estate tech. This boom will change every aspect of buying and selling real estate, as well as the homes that we live in.

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Smart homes (thermostats, lighting, security…)
  • Wireless access and bandwidth key
  • Health and wellness attributes on the rise
  • Suburbs could benefit from new transportation models
  1. Generational disruption

Babyboomers and millennials are now about the same. According to CRE The Baby Boomers generation of approximately 74 million (born between 1946 and 1964) is now smaller than the Millennial generations of approx. 75.4 million (born roughly between 1980 and 1997.) A significant number of today’s real estate decisions, as well as those connected to the workplace and consumer spending are now made by people under the age of 40. For the first time people are living and working together (both old and young). Boomers are wanting to move to inner suburbs and want more of an experiential lifestyle. “Surban” areas are the new it. These are suburban urban areas that feel urban-esque. People are looking for an urban feeling in suburban areas.

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Younger renters/buyers’ income limits
  • Marrying later, moving to suburbs
  • Older owners downsizing, selling, moving back to cities
  • Design, amenities differ by age group, yet they will live side-by-side in the same properties and neighborhoods
  • “Surban” communities thrive
  1. Retail disruption

According to CRE, there is a trend toward transforming retail in to “experiential” continues and is offsetting the shrinkage in the physical “bricks mortars” consumer goods platforms. Half of all U.S. households are members of Amazon Prime. There is a fundamental behavioral change in how people shop. The emphasis is on “timely, fast delivery of goods to consumers. May retailers are adopting an “Amazon-like approach, creating new warehouses; new distribution methods; and new fulfillment models while, ironically “disruptive retailers” such as Amazon are opening physical stores. With these changes, up to 30% of malls expected to close, but with this comes opportunities to repurpose the malls Retails is not dying, it is just changing. It is resilient. This disruption is similar to when Sears had to reinvent themselves because of Walmart.

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Walking distance retail demand is up
  • Unique destinations in high demand
  • Retail disruptions is a residential value determinant
  1. Infrastructure investment

We don’t really know what is going on with infrastructure now with the political polarization. It is clear that infrastructure investment is critical. 200 billion was spent over 10 years. 80% of which was state and local government. Mass transportation is being zeroed out. Don’t typically do tax reform or infrastructure spending in a time of growth.

The impact on residential real estate:

  • More infrastructure jobs = more income for housing
  • Better access to housing, work, shopping; improved utilities
  • Improved delivery of purchased goods
  • Potential higher costs for access to privately owned infrastructure (roads, utilities)
  1. Housing: The big mismatch

Affordability is a big issue. In Cleveland you can still buy a house for 80K. But, where jobs are being created there are huge affordability issues, i.e. Denver, West Coast… According to CRE, “Safe, decent, affordable housing has been shown to have a stabilizing effect on urban economies, crime, and public health.  A current lack of inventory has  generated a spike in home prices and, as a result, declining affordability for many home buyers, particularly those in lower income sectors.   A critical disparity exists between housing needs and housing supply. Although improving home prices, economic growth, mortgage accessibility and rental development have improved housing access and affordability in many areas, a confounding series of supply-demand mismatches continues to severely impact markets worldwide.  While the United States increasingly wrestles with the issue, a recent study of 300 metropolitan areas around the world ranked North America as a market with far fewer affordability problems than most.”

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Lack of inventory
  • Few “starter homes” for young buyers
  • Spike in home prices
  • Rising rents
  • Declining affordability
  • Poor market for older, larger homes in suburbs hinders Baby Boomer downsizing and moves
  1. Lost decades of the middle class

According to CRE, “After successive post-recession years of insignificant gains, median household incomes in the U.S. rose in 2015 by 5.2% to $56,516. Still, despite this welcome increase, middle class incomes have yet to recover their pre-recession highs ($57,403 in 2007), and are actually hovering below inflation-adjusted levels from almost two decades ago ($57,909).  Battered by automation and outsourcing, middle class jobs are still under pressure as the U.S. economy transitions from manufacturing to services.”

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Lack of funds for home purchases = postponed home buying
  • Debt and rents of more than 40% of income makes saving for down payment difficult
  • Little disposable income to support retail, restaurants…
  1. Real estate’s emerging role in health care

According to CRE, “Building occupants are increasingly demanding that the space they inhabit be designed, constructed, and operated in ways that advance positive health outcomes. It makes intuitive sense that buildings could help or hurt health in that people spend 90% of their time indoors. Research from the Mayo Clinic also concludes that only 20% of health comes from health care, with environmental and behavioral factors accounting for 40%.”

The impact of residential real estate:

  • Rising health care costs put a strain on household spending and saving
  • Potentially increased access to medical services at malls
  • May see health buildings/homes increase in desirability
  1. Immigration

According to CRE, “New immigrants tend to rent, boosting demand for multifamily housing, especially in gateway cities.  Recent surveys suggest that immigrant populations aspire to own homes and to move relatively freely from cities to suburbs and back in the search for employment. Labor mobility and homeownership rates will be constrained by limiting immigration. Industries like tech that demand highly skilled workers may be forced to innovate and substitute capital for labor if they cannot fill vacancies by recruiting foreign workers – constraining job growth. Longer term, if the entry of immigrant populations that tend to have larger households is curtailed, there will be a limit on the so-called demographic dividend for economic growth, with less of a labor force to support an aging population.”

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Fewer immigrants = fewer new household formations
  • Fewer renters
  • Fewer homebuyers
  • Fewer larger immigrant families = fewer larger homes needed
  • Affects urban and suburban areas alike
  1. Climate change

According to CRE, “In January 2017, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new report based on the most up to date scientific evidence on sea level rise that more than doubles the 2013 forecasts of potential sea level rise by 2100 from 2.2 to 4 feet to 6.6 to 8.6 feet.  Sea level rise is caused by both the thermal expansion of the oceans—as water warms up, it expands—and the melting of glaciers and ice sheets.  These dramatic rises were due largely to new research on the role of the Antarctic in sea rises as well as improved forecast models.  The Atlantic (Virginia Coast North) and western Gulf of Mexico Coasts’ sea rise is projected to be greater than the global average by .3 to .5 meters by 2100.  Alaska and the Pacific Northwest are projected to be 0.1 to 1 meter lower.

While a potential rise of sea level by 6.6 to 8.6 feet by 2100 may seem far in the future, NOAA also estimates that annual frequencies of disruptive and damaging flooding would increase 25-fold with only a 14-inch increase in local sea level rise.  Major cities such as Miami, New York, New Orleans, Tampa and Boston are projected to have the most costly problems, with South Florida and most coastal areas all exposed to differing levels of sea rise risk and cost.”

The impact on residential real estate:

  • Property value declines
  • Property insurance too costly or not offered in impacted areas
  • Potential early home sales before next climatic event to protect ‘nest egg” equity for retirement
  • Particularly in cities like Miami, NYC, New Orleans, Tampa, Boston, South Florida

CRE also identified three issues to watch including: tax reform and monetary policy, other policy issues and the cannabis.

The CRE Top Ten list is developed annually by members of the CRE organizations’ External Affairs group. The Counselors’ 1,100 members around the world undertake an extensive dialogue on current issue and trends to identify the final list. Click here to see the full list or follow #CRETopTen on Twitter.

To receive updates direct to your inbox, please subscribe.

SOURCE:
https://www.cre.org/
https://www.cre.org/news-releases/political-polarization-global-uncertainty-top-cre-2017-18-top-ten-issues-affecting-real-estate-list/
https://www.cre.org/external-affairs/alert-the-cre-2017-18-top-ten-issues-affecting-real-estate/
https://www.cre.org/external-affairs/cre-2016-2017-top-ten-issues-affecting-real-estate/

 

Corpus Christi real estate activity is alive and well; City continues to turn on seasonal activity

It is that time of year to start planning your summer vacations. The days are longer, Spring Break is over, and now we can look forward to a sunny spring and summer. This planning brings to mind our Texas beaches. On that note, today I would like to highlight Corpus Christi.

The South Texas Economic Development Center Economic Pulse, 2017, Issue 4 on the “Housing Market Downswing?” covers how the Corpus Christi housing market has boomed since the beginning of the decade. According to the article, “recently, the local economy has stalled in the wake of falling oil prices. Still the area’s residential construction remains remarkably active, and home prices stay at historically high levels.”

Here is a snapshot of the article:

  • The housing market has grown without major interruptions since 2000. Even during the burst of the nationwide housing bubble and the subsequent recession of 2007-2009, local home prices merely slowed down.
  • Along with other metro areas in Texas, Corpus Christi was among the top cities in home price appreciation during the decade ending in 2016.
  • The area’s median home price grew nearly 40 percent over the 2006-2016 period, slightly below the 45 percent and 44 percent growth rates for Houston and Dallas, respectively.While the median home price of the Corpus Christi metro area tended to rise at a solid pace in the past decade, the housing conditions varied widely across its local communities.A real estate bubble might have developed and then burst recently in the Rockport-Fulton area—the major community of Aransas County. Construction of a large number of industrial sites around the Port of Corpus Christi seems to have boosted the housing markets of various communities in San Patricio County. Following a long period of swings in different directions, the median home prices of these three counties converged to about $160,000 by the end of 2016.
  • Developers responded to rising home prices by increasing the supply of home units.The column chart below shows the Real Estate Center’s Texas Home Affordability Index (THAI) for Corpus Christi and the state. The index indicates the ability of the typical household, measured by total earnings, to buy a house selling for the median home price. The higher is the index, the more affordable are homes in the area.The chart suggests that homes in both Corpus Christi and Texas are less affordable today than in 2012. Home prices across Texas have caught up with income growth, which has recently slowed down from the 2011-2014 period of economic boom. Still the latest THAI readings remain higher, meaning more affordable, than their respective readings at the previous housing boom ending in 2007.
  • Given its relatively large exposure to the oil and gas industry, Corpus Christi’s overall economic condition is tied to developments in the oil market. For the three years that local personal income per capita recorded a loss, the crude oil price also fell. Year 2016 was the most recent period that local income per capita shrank, after the collapse of the oil market beginning in early 2015.
  • Oil and gas drilling and production in South Texas began to rebound in late 2016, and based on the oil futures market, oil prices are expected to rise steadily at least in the next six months.
  • Should the current market trends continue under normal conditions, home prices would rise modestly through the end of this year.
  • Corpus Christi will likely continue to recover from the recent economic downturn, holding up home demand.

Let’s talk about seasonal activity.

According to the Texas A & M Corpus Christi South Texas Economic Development Center Corpus Christi employment and unemployment reflect remarkable seasonal fluctuations. This to me, is no surprise given the tourist attractiveness of the city. In this article, Jim Lee covers the seasonal variations in unemployment not only from tourism, but also other cyclical activities which greatly effect South Texas, like harvest seasons and how this effects the agricultural sector, as well as government job and hiring patterns and their contribution to seasonal fluctuations. The graph below shows the Corpus Christi MSA unemployment rates, both the original and then in blue the seasonally adjusted rates.

“The level of farm employment indeed shows considerable seasonal variations. For the United States as a whole, the peak months for farm employment are March and September. Another regular seasonally pattern occurs in retail sales, which tend to peak during the holiday season in November and December 2017.” For Corpus, “employment typically peaks in April, and dips the most in January with New Year holidays.”

To explain the dips in the latter summer months, Lee attributes this to local government. He states, “compared to the average for the first half of the year, employment in the local government sector fell about 1,500 positions on average in July and about 1,200 position in August. This regular pattern was attributable to the summer break taken by some of those 2,500 local grade school teachers. The public sector typically recovered most of the jobs lost from those two summer months in the latter part of the year beginning in September.”

The bottom line, Corpus Christi will continue to be a strong housing market. There is inventory, homes continue to be affordable and the city is on the upward swing of recovery from the energy crisis. And, we now have the seasonal activity to look forward to. Bring on the summer.

To receive more Tandy on Real Estate updates direct to your inbox, please subscribe.

SOURCES:
http://stedc.tamucc.edu/files/Econ_Pulse_2017_1.pdf
https://stedc.atavist.com/housing-market-downswing

 

The state of Texas’ South Region

Texas is almost like a country in itself with 12 economic regions including: High Plains, West, Northwest, Metroplex, Upper East, Capital, Central, Southeast, Upper Rio Grande, Alamo, Gulf Coast and South.

Today I would like to take a look at what we Texans call “the Valley”, to look at our economy and job growth.

The much talked about border towns of Texas are growing, as is the opportunity for jobs. Texas’ South Region is comprised of the 28 counties covering the Gulf Cost and Mexico border and offers a “young, growing workforce”. According to the Texas Comptroller, “the South Region added more than 138,600 jobs from 2004 to 2014, led by Hidalgo County. Its 26 percent job growth accounted for 37 percent of the region’s net new jobs.”

Here is how South Texas ranked against Texas and the US on Job Growth.

Job growth 2004 – 2014
South Texas – 20.1%
Texas – 21.7%
U.S. – 5.5%

In the Texas Comptroller’s Regional Snapshot, they conclude that “The South Region is one of Texas’ fastest growing and most diverse. It overlies a portion of the Eagle Ford Shale that has helped fuel the state’s energy resurgence. It also serves as a hub for shipping, farming and manufacturing. Meanwhile, tourists flock to shoreline destinations such as Corpus Christi and South Padre Island.

The region offers a dynamic workforce. Both birth and graduation rates top state averages. It has also added jobs at a faster rate than Texas as a whole, though wages lag significantly behind the state average. Rapid growth, coupled with drought conditions, has strained the region’s water supplies.

Thriving cities, agriculture and mining helped drive Texas’ largest consumption increase over the past decade. In all, the region offers much promise. It will remain relatively young and culturally dynamic  while supporting some of Texas’  key industries.”

Here is the rest of the story from the Comptroller.

To receive more Tandy on Real Estate updates direct to your inbox, please subscribe.

SOURCES:
http://stedc.tamucc.edu/rei/
https://www.comptroller.texas.gov/economy/docs/regions/region-10.pdf
http://eaglefordshale.com/

© 2018 Tandy On Real Estate — Powered by WordPress

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑